about

about

Where to begin? Like most folks I had my whole childhood on bicycles. That continued into work ON them (as a courier) and later with them as a mechanic. Eventually I made my way into teaching some mechanics classes to kids and then finally made the leap and created my first bicycle frame back in 1996. After that I spent my time working for others, first making parts, then frames, repetitive honing of the skills I was learning as we produced hundreds of frames per year. As time moved on I always wanted to experiment, to try new materials, new methods, new geometries- but the production shop is no place for that sort of dallying and by 2009 my young family and I made the leap. My first frames as Rosko Cycles were mainly lightweight road bikes- but I had a weird idea. Lightweight and succinct racing machines, welded without flourish or decor. At the time it was so left field- the hand carved lug was the order of the day and the niche industry of "framebuilding" was an arms race to see who could make their bikes the most ornate. So I stepped aside and made these simple bikes, hoping riders would see that action should be inherent in the aesthetic. Over the years I have honed MY vision of how a bike should ride and what it should look like. Neither crafted nor custom. A tool for your purpose, meeting of rider and builder. It's a never ending process- each frame builds on the lessons learned with the last. We work with the finest materials, the newest equipment and riders that push things to and beyond the limit. What makes it special? What makes it worth the wait? Is there something intangible the builder can imbue the material with that the factory overseas cannot? Some mysterious force driven by progression and adventure?

To be honest I'm hard pressed to nail these philosophical questions down into a paragraph about myself and what I do, or why I'm driven to do it. Instead I'm going to quote a friend who seems to have summed it up nicely...

"Seth Rosko builds steel frames quietly in Brooklyn with little fan-fare or publicity.  As a bike builder, he draws on his experience racing and fabricating vintage motorcycles, and his many years of work under the Brooklyn Machine Works (known for their Gangsta Track, DH and park bikes) banner. Since setting off on his own, Seth seems eager to challenge himself with designing frames to fit the individual rider, from road to BMX bikes.  His background serves him well as he succeeds in achieving understated form driven by function, frames that speak in pure, purposeful designs for aggressive riding and racing.  There are no hand-carved lugs, no polished head-badges, just precisely-machined bits, thoughtfully affixed to quality tubes."  -ChopChop